Episode 013

A rose by any other word

Featuring text from Romeo and Juliet, fibre blending on a homemade hackle, sweater knitting, and red wine chocolate cake. Yum!

Listen here:

(00:29) Welcome

Segments

  • All Spun Up
  • Loops
  • Events
  • HomeCulture
  • That’s my story
  • American English
  • Moment of Drama

(1:37)All Spun Up

Preparation

All this hackle blending fun!
Hackle Blending

My fibre goals for the Tour de Fleece…
IMG_9330

(8:26) Loops

On the Needles

Sill working on my Pomme de Pin Cardigan by Amy Christoffers

(10:03) HomeCulture

What’s Cooking

Chocolate Red Wine Cake recipe at Food and Wine

Lovely cheese and quince cheese from Stratford shop: Paxton and Whitfield

(13:39) American English

Quay and Query

(15:35) Moment of Drama

Romeo and Juliet

Act II Scene ii

Quarto 1 (1597)

Tis but thy name that is mine enemie.
Whats Mountague? It is nor hand nor foote,
Nor arme, nor face, nor any other part.
Whats in a name? That which we call a Rose,
By any other name would smell as sweet:
So Romeo would, were he not Romeo cald,
Retaine the divine perfection he owes:
Without that title Romeo part thy name,
And for that name which is no part of thee,
Take all I have.

Quarto 2 (1599)

Tis but thy name that is my enemie:
Thou art thy selfe, though not a Mountague,
Whats Mountague? it is nor hand nor foote,
Nor arme nor face, ô be some other name
Belonging to a man.
Whats in a name that which we call a rose,
By any other word would smell as sweete,
So Romeo would were he not Romeo cald,
Retaine that deare perfection which he owes,
Without that tytle, Romeo doffe thy name,
And for thy name which is no part of thee,
Take all my selfe.

Folio (1623)

‘Tis but thy name that is my Enemy:
Thou art thy selfe, though not a Mountague,
What’s Mountague? it is nor hand nor foote,
Nor arme, nor face, O be some other name
Belonging to a man.
What? in a names that which we call a Rose,
By any other word would smell as sweete,
So Romeo would, were he not Romeo cal’d,
Retaine that deare perfection which he owes,
Without that title Romeo, doffe thy name,
And for thy name which is no part of thee,
Take all my selfe.

Also the Prologue from Romeo and Juliet

Quarto 1 (1597)

Two houshold Frends alike in dignitie,
(In faire Verona, where we lay our Scene)
From civill broyles broke into enmitie,
Whose civill warre makes civill hands uncleane.
From forth the fatall loynes of these two foes,
A paire of starre-crost Lovers tooke their life:
Whose misadventures, piteous overthrowes,
(Through the continuing of their Fathers strife,
And death-markt passage of their Parents rage)
Is now the two howres traffique of our Stage.
The which if you with patient eares attend,
What here we want wee’l studie to amend.

Quarto 2 (1599)

Two housholds both alike in dignitie,
(In faire Verona where we lay our Scene)
From auncient grudge, breake to new mutinie,
Where civill bloud makes civill hands uncleane:
From forth the fatall loynes of these two foes,
A paire of starre-crost louers, take their life:
Whose misadventur’d pittious overthrowes,
Doth with their death burie their Parents strife.
The fearfull passage of their death-markt loue,
And the continuance of their Parents rage:
Which but their childrens end nought could remove:
Is now the two houres trafficque of our Stage.
The which if you with patient eares attend,
What heare shall misse, our toyle shall strive to mend.

Folio (1623)

A prologue doesn’t appear in the folio version

(26:38) Shall we Shog?

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